How to Make a Makerspace

Want to start your own?

Artisan’s Asylum has worked with communities and spaces across the country looking to start makerspaces or continue to grow existing programs. Our staff can help guide you through the many steps involved in starting and running a makerspace, including equipment selection, safety, infrastructure and more. Please contact us at for more information.

In the meantime we’ve gathered the basics information in a collection of resources below. If you are local, we also recommend attending one of our public tours to learn about our space and our community.

How to Make a Makerspace Resources

Artisan’s Asylum has worked with Maker Media to share the knowledge of founders, technical specialists, and makerspace community members to offer you a body of written materials designed to boil down a lot of our lessons learned and help you through the challenges ahead!

Start with these short pieces, written for the MAKE Blog:

As you start putting together your business model, check out the financial projections worksheet we use in our one-day Maker Con workshop (offered before the New York and San Mateo Maker Faires in 2013 and 2014).

Presentations and handouts from our 2-day inaugural February 2013 conference are available and for download through dropbox here. Notes and video from some of the presentations are available at

Asylum Renter Studios

What’s a makerspace?

To describe them simply, makerspaces are community centers with tools. Makerspaces combine manufacturing equipment, community, and education for the purposes of enabling community members to design, prototype and create manufactured works that wouldn’t be possible to create with the resources available to individuals working alone. These spaces can take the form of loosely-organized individuals sharing space and tools, for-profit companies, non-profit corporations, organizations affiliated with or hosted within schools, universities or libraries, and more. All are united in the purpose of providing access to equipment, community, and education, and all are unique in exactly how they are arranged to fit the purposes of the community they serve.

Makerspaces represent the democratization of design, engineering, fabrication and education. They are a fairly new phenomenon, but are beginning to produce projects with significant national impacts; notable projects and companies to emerge from makerspaces include the Pebble Watch (a programmable watch whose team is the recipient of the largest Kickstarter campaign in history), MakerBot (creators of a low-cost 3D printer that’s revolutionizing the entire rapid prototyping industry), and Square (a painless payment gateway enabling small businesses to collect money easily worldwide), just to name a few.

Makerspace Products

February 2013 Event Sponsors:

Artisan's Asylum and MAKE

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